Jane Hayes

KEEPING THE FOCUS ON FUNCTION

by Jane Hayes on November 1, 2018 Comments Off on KEEPING THE FOCUS ON FUNCTION

Fat biking takes you cool places 🙂

Thanks for following c2!

Hey quick update for all of you wanting to share the c2 love this holiday season! As you may know, as of last year West Hill Shop is the c2 sales and distribution partner. If you tried ordering last season, you already know we had a really hard time creating a shopping experience that was efficient  and satisfying and kept all our customers warm and happy. This was due to changes in the way our website is put together by the various plugins (a wordpress thing) which do things like, check inventory levels, allow you to pick your shipping method, and assure a safe financial transaction when your ready to check out.

Before now, there were two websites for buying c2 on line. As of now all the sales of c2 will go through the westhillshop.com, and from there your orders will be verified and processed. West Hill Shop also manages all returns and exchanges, so that doesn’t change. So short story long, we think it will make everything easier for everyone, and we really hope that’s true for you.

This is a really exciting change, actually. It means that c2 will now specialize exclusively on design and development of the best products to keep you comfortable and outside, which is what we do best. We think useful, functional products are the heart of the c2 brand. Please help us celebrate the launch of the West Hill C2 shop by enjoying $20 off purchases of $100 or over good through 11/17/18 when you check out on westhillshop.com Use Checkout Code: C2WHSfall18

XXOO

read more
KEEPING THE FOCUS ON FUNCTION

November is for Lungs?

by Jane Hayes on November 22, 2017 Comments Off on November is for Lungs?

November is all about the lungs. In most cooler climates, it’s dryer and colder. While our bodies still want to party like it’s summer, our lungs don’t often want to go outside. But with longer nights and short days ‘bearing’ down hard, it’s no time to lose your fitness momentum.

Walk and Talk

Did you notice we don’t talk much anymore? If you look back 20 years, people were speaking as communication so much more. You know another thing we don’t do much of anymore? Walk. When was the last time you walked over to a friend’s and just said hi? Instead of texting, take the opportunity to pick up the phone. With just a few minutes a day, and you can start with 15, it’s fairly easy to make walking and/or talking a habit that’s in place during all the bad weather that’s coming.

The best part is… you know what walking and talking does for your lungs? It increases respiratory volume by increasing O2 required, benefiting you with deeper more regular respiration. In case you do not get out to exercise every day, this is a very good thing. Just breathing more deeply for a few minutes per day gets your breath going where its needed, since the energy and other nutrition the lungs move are pushed down throughout the whole body. Start with a walk at lunchtime, or go for a short one after dinner while you are digesting. Take a friend along. Walking while talking is double points!

Start right away. Do some breathing. Maintain the body and mind.

To celebrate LUNG month and keep you outside and excited use the coupon code LUNGITUP17 for 20% any non sale top in our webstore through 11/30/17.

read more
November is for Lungs?

WEST HILL NAMED OFFICIAL OUTFITTER!

by Jane Hayes on August 28, 2017 Comments Off on WEST HILL NAMED OFFICIAL OUTFITTER!

Starting in fall of 2017, our favorite c2 dealer West Hill Shop becomes the first certified fitter for c2 apparel. So please join us c2 in thanking them for all their hard work and how they make our active lives as cyclists, hikers, skiers, and lovers of the outdoors better. If you’re not familiar with the shop, please take a moment to enjoy their story here.

I first learned about West Hill when I raced at the legendary Putney Mountain Bike race back in the 90s. West Hill always sponsored it, and visits to the shop made everyone want to work there! In later years New England had a national level mountain bike race at Mt Snow. West Hill racers called that a home game, and the team always ranked well among the racers in from out of town. It sure was fun seeing the legendary WH jersey design on so many podiums and the team name all over the results.

If you’re in the area, please visit the shop. It features beautiful backdrop, authentic country decor, and staff that shares information you want and need when you’re gearing up. They’re also a great resource for where to ride, hike, ski and where the good snow conditions are.

West Hill Shop
49 Brickyard Lane
Putney, VT 05346
(802) 387-5718

read more
WEST HILL NAMED OFFICIAL OUTFITTER!

NEMBAfest Kingdom Trails VT June 16-18th 2017

by Jane Hayes on June 13, 2017 Comments Off on NEMBAfest Kingdom Trails VT June 16-18th 2017

I was that person. I thought since I was at the first Pedro’s New England Mountain Bike Festival in 1995, that in 2016 it probably wasn’t still for me. Maybe I thought I was too cool to do anything as wholesome as supporting your local mountain bike advocacy non-profit. Maybe that was just an excuse for feeling like I might feel too old or not have any friends there. It’s huge for anyone who mountain biked in the 80s and 90s to realize there are more people mountain biking now that you don’t know than that you do know.

But since I have a brand and I love when mountain bikers discover it, I finally went back into the frying pan and got a booth at NEMBAfest 2016. It was amazing. I know it was partly the weather (picture perfect, dry and highs in the 70s), but the event planners deserve plenty of credit as well. Besides every possible demo bike under the sun being available to ride, there are food trucks, entertainment, camping, showers, moderately clean porta potties, mountain biking, and a certain amount of beer and camaraderie.

This year c2 and SEMASS NEMBA have teamed up so you can represent for mountain biking and support their chapter at the same time. Our idea was that mountain biking is always fun, but it’s better together when you ride with friends. So please stop by either their amazing campground location or the c2 booth to check out our new tshirts and support something that makes you feel good. It wasn’t all that long ago that one of these and a pair of cutoffs was what we rode in, BTW.So this year I’m going to NEMBAfest again, and hope to catch up and ride with more friends and share bits of people’s actual lives while riding and enjoying the view and other joys. You should come too! Demo some c2 at no risk, and you get your choice of arm warmers, socks, or a pint glass even if you don’t choose to keep it. But just a warning, you are going to want to keep it. Vermont hillsides get chilly even by a warm fire, and c2 keeps the chill away.

read more
NEMBAfest Kingdom Trails VT June 16-18th 2017

c2 arm warmers offer comfort during radiation treatments

by Jane Hayes on April 25, 2017 Comments Off on c2 arm warmers offer comfort during radiation treatments

We all know someone who has had cancer, has been impacted by cancer, or has been taken from us by cancer. Most people have had multiple of these scenarios. When I received a recent email, it was so heart warming I was inspired to share. I learned that c2 arm warmers were a comfort to women receiving radiation treatments. They explained that during radiation therapy, experiencing cold arms is common. It’s not surprising, since most often the patient is positioned with arms above head, and that’s a challenge to circulation, particularly in older women. Of course men get breast cancer too, so let’s not leave them out of this new suggested use. As a very small business owner, I live for stories like these. I wanted to share the note, since first person accounts are so helpful. Thanks to Terri for sending it along and for the ladies who have tried this for sharing their product story with me:

“My dear running friend was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer before Christmas, making her the 3rd woman at our small school in less than a year to be facing breast cancer. Not fair! All three have been amazing on their very unique paths through treatment. Two weeks ago the running friend stopped me in the parking lot – blocking traffic – to share her excitement about a discovery regarding the c2 arm warmers I’d bought for her a couple years back. She asked if I’d be willing to loan out mine to the other mom who is being treated here locally and is now doing radiation. My running friend described how uncomfortable it was for her to hold still during radiation and it was much worse because her arms got really cold… until she realized she could don her arm warmers!
It was beyond heartwarming to see how happy she was to have come up with a sporty, practical solution when so much of her treatment is out of her hands.
I made sure to drop off my arm warmers to the other mom before we left for spring break. This mom is not athletic, nor is her husband, so I quickly realized I needed to describe what they were and how to use them. Although she seemed skeptical, she tried them at her next session, was very happy to have the added warmth and is sold on keeping them until she’s done too.”
If c2 inspires you to get out there and breathe yourself, why not share your story? Email me at jane@buyc2.com. Have a peaceful day.
read more
c2 arm warmers offer comfort during radiation treatments

Ride 2017 volume: 2

by Jane Hayes on April 14, 2017 Comments Off on Ride 2017 volume: 2

This is the second of three installments about riding to work, which I hope will get you excited and inspired about getting out of the car and into the fresh air. Join the two wheeled ranks for all or some of your commute to work, school or any place you have to get to on a regular basis when a car isn’t really necessary. If you missed the first post and want to get caught up, you can find it here. Today I wanted to talk about logistics and bike selection, since they are lots of bicycles out there and even more ways to get to work which combine cycling, running, walking, public transportation, and cars. I’ve broken down the information so you can use what you find useful and skip sections that aren’t.

Multi-modal commuting can be the best of both worlds. If you’re fortunate enough to have a bike friendly public transportation system, there are lots of different ways to combine trains, buses, bikes, and your feet in your daily commute. Here in the Boston area, we are allowed to commute with folding bikes on most trains. In addition, many of the T stations have bike lockers or ‘mass bike parking’ racks so that if you’d like to avoid the most urban part of the bicycle commute and you have a sturdy lock, you stand a good chance of having a reliable place to park your bike if you ride to a T shop. But that’s far from the only combination worth considering in a multi modal commute. In fact if you live so far from work that some part of your commute has to be driven, it can be much more time efficient to get on the bike for the terminal end of a commute into a big city.  Finding the best route (see installment one) is the key. If you are trying to save money and you like running, but running alone makes for just too much mileage, try combining public transportation, the car, or carpooling with a run that is the length that works for you. It’s important if you’re carrying gear or your lunch to have a way to keep your load fairly tight fitting to your body, so a large waist pack or a lower profile back-pack may be a worthwhile investment. Also consider that you probably need to carry some water, or navigate to strategically located water fountains at very least. The beauty of multimodal commuting is that you can try different lengths of segments and adjust to what you find works best for you. So if you’re intimidated by riding your whole commute every day, consider taking it in parts until you feel ready to take on the whole thing on the bike or on foot.

Not every day needs to be the same. Now that you may have to carry lots of clothes, stuff for showering, or your lunch, remember that not every day needs to be the same, even if that’s your goal. The truth is if you want to ride the whole way every day, there’s always a way to make it happen, but that might seem daunting at first. So there may be days when you have an opportunity to stage some extra clothes, underwear, deodorant, snack bars, or a large bag of salted roasted cashews at your workplace, and the key is remembering that those days are an opportunity to get your workplace supplies squared away for the days when you want to ride without a bag. I always like to bring food from home for lunch, since it’s healthier and the right portion size, so on most days, that plus water is the minimum I’ll carry. Every day’s commuting mode choice does not have to be the same, and morning and evening on any one day do not have to be the same. If you have easy overnight parking available at work, you can try driving in with your bike in the morning, leaving the car at work and riding home. Then ride back in the next morning and drive home some night later in the week. Remember to bring enough clothing for however many days you need on the first day when you have lots of room in the car. If you have to dress really nicely every day, consider having a dry cleaning service pick-up and deliver back to you at work. You might find that other people in your office want to do that too. If your planning hits a wall due to no way to clean up before you put your work clothes on, keep in mind that you will stay fairly clean if you shower before leaving the house, and may be able to get by with a washcloth wipe down or baby wipes, and deodorant if you were all clean only an hour before. Sweat mostly only smells bad if it’s left on, so some people can even just towel the sweat off and reapply deodorant. And finally, a nearby gym to your workplace may offer a ‘shower only’ membership with some negotiation. Or you might find a gym that’s so cheap it will be worthwhile to join anyway. After all that riding you will be doing, a yoga or stretching class every so often will do wonders and give you that necessary down time you miss during a long work day. If you really get addicted to riding to work, you’re probably going to get in a rhythm that is the same from day to day and will need to carry your whole day’s worth of stuff on the bike. Depending on the dress code at your destination, and to some extent the season, that could mean a day’s worth of clothes is packable into a fairly tight space, or it may take up a whole bag. Some clothes just aren’t packable if you need to meet a high standard of dress at work. For those who have to really dress up, leaving a set of outfits at work really makes the most sense. If you can dress casually every day, or dress lightly in summer, you’ll have an easier time in getting your work clothes to work with you. In some seasons, and if you have ultimate flexibility in what you look like at work, there are actually pieces now available that you could ride to work in, stay in at work, and ride home in, depending on your hygiene situation, length of your ride, and the weather. In the next installment, we’ll talk about gear that works for riding and at work, but if you do some research you might see there are products specifically for this.

How to manage a whole day’s worth of stuff on a bike.So what’s the best way to carry what you need on your commute? Of course that depends on many things, such as how much you will carry, how far you are going to go, and whether or not your bike has a bike rack to attach bags to. The most reliable and versatile option is not the most comfortable, but a backpack is a great first investment for any cyclist. When selecting a backpack, make your commute safer by making sure it’s maximally reflective, and has attachment points for blinkies. There are actually bags made out of 100% reflective materials now, and you’d be surprised how bright they appear in the presence of headlights when it’s dark out. There are a few brands that work exclusively in that material, which are a great choice. If you don’t want something on your back, which can make you hotter on a hot day, other bag options include panniers (which typically hang off the sides of a rear rack), or other frame mounted bags which have been developed for ‘bikepacking’, the latest trend in lightweight adventure riding. Check the internet for some of those terms and explore on your own. Keep in mind all bags do not fit on all bikes, so the best place to make sure you are buying something you can use is your local bike shop. They will be a key partner if you’re starting to bike commute, since you may need expert and efficient help on short notice, so stop in often and please try to shop local as much as possible. The more you go into a bike shop, the more comfortable and familiar it will be.

What bike is the best for you? What style of bars you select actually does matter. You will see plenty of riders on ‘drop bars’ which come stock on most road bikes, but since you need to keep your head up and be able to look behind yourself to check for anything that poses a threat from behind, flat bars or rise bars make much more sense. Drop bars are mostly beneficial to road racers due to the aerodynamics of your body when you are crouched over, but at less than 15 MPH with hazards coming at you from all directions, you will be much better off in a more upright position.

The chances of your having to lock up somewhere during your commuting day means that a bike that has any apparent value is going to be more likely to be stolen or vandalized while it awaits your return. Vandals watch for patterns. Anyone who really wants your bike may find a way to get to it when few people are around, so my best advice on avoiding becoming a victim is to spend more than $35 on a lock, lock in a way that makes it hard for someone to seal the frame and wheels, and make sure you’re not riding a bike that costs more than $500. I’m not saying don’t spend more than $500 on a bike, but it’s important not to have your brand new bike look too good and catch the attention of the wrong person. When you buy your lock, ask the local bike shop person to show you how to lock in a way that makes it hard to steal either wheel, and if necessary also carry a cable so you can secure the wheels. You might not want to carry your lock setup. That’s Ok because you can leave it at work and it will always be there for you.

Finally I wanted to mention electric assist bikes, folding bikes, and fat bikes. Like I said earlier, when you are starting out on a commute to work program, almost any bike is a good starter bike. These newer options on the market have their share of pros and cons and if you’re speaking to a salesperson, you might not get the whole story before you find yourself walking out of the store with something you’re not 100% is going to serve you.

  • Electric bikes: pros are they will get you there quickly, you might not be as sweaty as someone on a regular bike, and if you are worried about not having the energy or motivation to ride that should not be an issue on an e-bike. Cons are: they are heavier than non-motorized bikes, you won’t get as much exercise or burn as many calories, and you may not be as satisfied or exercised once you’re home on the couch looking back on the day.
  • Folding bikes: pros are you can take them on the train and easily pack them in a car trunk, they are lightweight and easy to carry up stairs, and you can probably take it all the way to your desk or office any alleviate the risk of locking up and losing your bike. Cons are they don’t always fit all riders well, the smaller wheels usually transmit ground impact up to your hands and butt more than normal wheels, and if you want one bike that does it all, you might not find that you want to ride it on the weekends since sometimes they are not as comfortable as a normal wheeled bike.
  • Cargo bikes: This category is almost so inclusive that it’s meaningless. A cargo bike by definition historically has the flexibility to carry cargo, sometimes up to 50 pounds, but some carry the load in front and/or the rear, some are super long wheel based (almost like a tandem length), and some either come ready to or can be fit to carry kids on the back or in front. The category itself is really a great idea, but they may be cost prohibitive if you also want a bike to ride with your friends on the weekend.

In the next installment, I’ll cover clothes you can wear all day, how to perform a safety check on your bike, and what do to if your bike stops working. If you have questions, please post them!

Why am I writing this? I’m a passionate veteran ‘ride (walk or run) every day’ commuter. I’ve been avoiding cars as often as possible and getting around almost exclusively on a bike since moving to Boston in the 80s. People ask me all the time: is it safe? I think safety is a matter of preparedness and understanding defensive bicycle riding. It’s not a race. Sometimes you have to slow down just to stay safe. Some intersections are just unsafe, and then there’s distracted driving, which is sadly everywhere, everyday. But if you give it a try you might find it’s life changing. -Jane Hayes

read more
Ride 2017 volume: 2

Ride 2017 volume: 1

by Jane Hayes on April 3, 2017 Comments Off on Ride 2017 volume: 1

It’s getting warmer and the days are getting longer! If you’ve considered starting to ride your bike to work, maybe this is the year. Before you get started the idea may be daunting, but once you’ve tried it and pushed through the initial challenges of route selection, equipment and logistics, I would bet you will never want to go back to driving or public transportation. Riding to work is that good. This is the first of three posts which I hope will inspire and motivate you to shed your dependence on the car and start or restart riding to work or school. I’ll start by break down route selection factors which are unique to commuting on a bike, then cover equipment, logistics, and other gear in the next two installments.

I’ve been riding to work in the Boston area for about 30 years. While I don’t do it every day, I definitely try to. The truth is whenever life gets in the way of riding to work, I miss it terribly, and work crawls by at a snail’s pace. When I don’t ride I’m jealous of all the cyclists I see on the way. But fortunately there’s always tomorrow. Benefits to being a bike commuter are numerous; firing up your metabolism early in the day, calorie burning while you ride, money saving, burning less carbon based fuels and keeping your heart healthy just to name a few. But some lesser known benefits are a predictable arrival time at your destination, no need to factor in time looking for parking, and stress reduction both before and after work. In the morning you can begin to think over what your day will look like. In the evening, a ride offers you the opportunity to change your mindset and mood and prepare for dinner or family time if that’s what greets you at home. You may even be able to avoid going to the gym quite so often, although other activities during the week, particularly yoga, stretching, and swimming, are great compliments to cycling.

Today I wanted to talk about route selection to help anyone get started on the right track. Your safe and fun cycling route to work or school will often be quite different than how you might drive there. Route selection can actually make or break your good time on a bicycle commute. Let’s focus on 4 main considerations, but know that safety is the overriding theme which we always have to keep on top of mind. Many people do not have any dedicated bike paths to use, so cars will always be something to contend with, even if you live in a bike friendly place.

Space. As noted, everyone’s transportation environment is not full of car-free bike paths and protected bike lanes. When riding on the road, the amount of pavement useable for cyclists varies greatly. If you have to share the road with cars, try to avoid roads with parked cars on both sides where cars don’t have enough room to get by you without crossing the yellow line. If this is where you have to ride, know that car drivers may be in a rush and often get pretty upset when someone like a cyclist slows them down. While you have every right to be there, it’s not always a good idea to flaunt that right (think moose and squirrel…). A more sustainable attitude is to try to instill the feeling that you want to stay out of the way, keeping in mind the most important thing to you is your safety. I actually feel bad for drivers, because they have to be in a car and I’m out on my bike! But no matter your attitude, it’s preferable to pick a quieter, wider road, and avoid routes that bring out the worst in impatient (honking, engine revving) vehicle drivers.

Surface conditions. Another thing that is truly worthy of avoiding is poorly paved roads, routes under construction, and any roads that have surface level train tracks which run a similar direction to your path of travel. I have one road in particular that has the problems I mentioned in #1 (no space and full of parked cars) and is never exactly well paved, but would be on the most direct driving route if I was to drive. Part of efficient travel is predicated on not having a mechanical incident or accident so I select another route. If you have no choice but to travel on an undesirable section, like when there’s really only one bridge option over a river or a man made barrier, try to stay aware of what’s in front, behind, the surface below, and objects to the sides of you, to keep your personal space safe. Sometimes you can’t safely swerve around a pothole because there’s a truck bearing down from behind which can’t move over in its lane. As you ride more you will increase your awareness and become better at knowing what’s coming from behind as well as everything you can see in front of you. After you’ve done your commute 10-20 times, you will also observe changing road conditions, like snow/sand/salt piles, potholes, debris accumulation, construction, and start to have an expert understanding of all of the nuances of your selected commuting route.

Intersections. You may also live somewhere that the streets do not all meet at a right angle. Some may have traffic lights or controlled walk signs, and there may even be uncontrolled intersections where signs are missing and people are just supposed to know who has the right of way. Either way, at or near intersections is where most accidents happen, so you have to be on your guard and super defensive as you approach and cross an intersection. And keep in mind that car drivers often take a minute to check text messages or social media when stopped, so when they resume motion as the light turns green, they don’t always make a complete assessment of what’s around them first, especially when someone behind is honking at them. In picking your route, you may want to plan to detour around a really horrible intersection. Where I live, running red lights, even when a the pedestrian signal says walk, is a ticketable offense. I’m not saying it should be otherwise, but if you are new to riding with cars this is a key rule to consistently follow. To make sure you are visible when stopped at an intersection, wait near the front of the lead cars, so you’re first to cross the intersection, and after exiting the intersection try to get out of their way as a courtesy.

Solar Glare. If your commuting time is near sunset or sunrise, as it is for most of us, solar glare can be blinding during different times of the year. Cyclists should definitely consider year round eye protection, even when the sun is not out, but I’m really talking about the impact it has on car drivers when I say it’s an important safety concern for cyclists. In multiple situations; crossing a street to make a left turn from a stop, traveling into the sun with cars behind you, and at intersections; beware of the possibility that you may not be visible and ride where you have an ‘escape route’ in case you realize you have to suddenly change your path to avoid a car that seems not to see you. Some cyclists use head and tail lights even while riding in daylight. That won’t necessarily help in the case of solar glare which is usually so bright little else can be defined in the field of view.

Think about these factors as you pick your bike commuting route. If several of them are present anywhere on your route, consider a reroute. If you identify more than one critical safety factor, that multiplies the risk of an accident or incident, so please consider another route. In the next two posts in the series, we’ll look at other important factors such as bike selection, clothing, and continue helping you find alternative safe and satisfying ways to get to work. Please share this post to inspire your family and friends to do the same.

Why am I writing this? I’m a passionate veteran ‘ride (walk or run) every day’ commuter. I’ve been avoiding cars as often as possible and getting around almost exclusively on a bike since moving to Boston in the 80s. People ask me all the time: is it safe? I think safety is a matter of preparedness and understanding defensive bicycle riding. It’s not a race. Sometimes you have to slow down just to stay safe. Some intersections are just unsafe, and then there’s distracted driving, which is sadly everywhere, everyday. But if you give it a try you might find it’s life changing. -Jane Hayes

read more
Ride 2017 volume: 1

2017 EVENTS: HUMBOLDT BAY MARATHON

by Jane Hayes on March 16, 2017 Comments Off on 2017 EVENTS: HUMBOLDT BAY MARATHON

c2 will once again be a sponsor of this awesome event Sunday August 13th and we invite you to join the festivities and come cheer on the runners!

The full marathon course provides a rare, scenic diverse tour around Humboldt Bay, and is considered to have some gently rolling hills over a generally level course.

The half marathon will start near the famous Arcata Plaza and merge with the marathon course as the course leaves Arcata into open dairy farms before heading down the west side of Humboldt Bay and into Eureka with spectacular views of Humboldt Bay and the Eureka Waterfront and Marina.

c2 would like to officially thank the organizers, runners, supporters and the local people and businesses that collaborate to make this event as great as it is. Please take 20% off your purchase of $50 or more on all non sale items from our store by entering the coupon code HUMB17 at checkout. The coupon is good through 9/29/17. Our gear is great for training and racing, and will help you get those crucial base miles in before the summer weather sets in. We’re made in the USA so you can shop with pride. Please also tell us about your c2 experience by writing a review on any of the products you try and thank you again.

You can register here: http://www.active.com/eureka-ca/running/distance-running-races/3rd-annual-humboldt-bay-marathon-2017

read more
2017 EVENTS: HUMBOLDT BAY MARATHON

2017 EVENTS: NEMBA WOMENS SUMMIT

by Jane Hayes on March 16, 2017 Comments Off on 2017 EVENTS: NEMBA WOMENS SUMMIT

Coming soon: more information about this exciting inaugural event. There will be panel discussions, rides, lots of time to be social with like minded mountain bikers, and maybe even a fashion show. c2 will be a major sponsor of the event, and that means there will be many changes to demo and win c2 via raffles and just for going on rides. Challenge yourself on the best trails in the area, or take part in a skills clinic with some of the best riders in the area. The event will be held August 11th-13th at Kingdom Trails in East Burke Vermont. Register here and join the fun: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nemba-womens-mountain-bike-summit-tickets-32342684841

read more
2017 EVENTS: NEMBA WOMENS SUMMIT